How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

by formerchef on November 29, 2014

How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

This post is part 2 in a series on emulsified sauces. To read part 1 which covers history and how to make Hollandaise Sauce, go here.

Mayonnaise was originally called “Mahonnaise” from the town Spanish town on the island of Minorca called Mahon, captured by the French in the late 1700’s. It’s said a French general’s cook created the sauce made from eggs and oil to celebrate the victory because he had no cream.

Most Americans are familiar with mayonnaise in the form of the commercially made Best Foods or Hellman’s brands. This sauce originated in a New York deli in 1912 as a dressing for sandwiches, originally bottled with a “blue ribbon” on it. In 1932 Hellman’s was purchased by the California company Best Foods and they now sell almost half of all mayonnaise purchased in the US. The names are still split; anything west of the Rockies is Best Foods, anything east is Hellman’s. Inside the jar, it’s all the same.

Commercial mayonnaise is good, but try making your own for a very fresh flavor, plus watching something go from liquid to solid is a treat for kids. Mayonnaise is best known as a sandwich spread, but can also be used as a base for dips and salad dressings.

Mayonnaise is similar to hollandaise in that it uses egg and oil, but because it’s a cold sauce, it’s much easier to make. The typical ratio is about 3/4 of a cup of oil per egg yolk. Any more oil and the emulsion may break.

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How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

 

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How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 5 minutes

Total Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 room temperature egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar or fresh lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard (optional)
  • 1 cup neutral oil (like canola or grapeseed), mild olive oil or a blend
  • ½  teaspoon kosher salt
  • ¼ teaspoon freshly ground white pepper

Instructions

    Tips:
  1. Let the egg yolks come to room temperature. You will get better results and an easier emulsion if the eggs are not cold.
  2. Separate the eggs, reserving the egg whites for future use.
  3. Instructions for making in food processor:
  4. Place the two egg yolks, the vinegar (or lemon juice), mustard, salt and white pepper in the food processor bowl. Pulse several times to combine the ingredients. Turn the processor on and through the feed tube, pour about 1/3 of the oil in, in a very slow stream. The eggs and oil will begin to emulsify and thicken. Stop the processor and remove the lid. With a rubber spatula scrape down the sides, and if there is any raw egg near the center bottom of the bowl, scrape it outward toward the rest of the sauce.
  5. Put the lid back on and turn the machine back on. Through the feed tube, pour the rest of the oil in, in a very slow stream.
  6. Once you have added the oil and the sauce is thick, taste for seasoning. Add salt and pepper or even an extra bit of vinegar or lemon juice to your personal taste.
  7. If the mayonnaise gets too thick, whisk in a tablespoon of ice water, one at a time, until it reaches the desired consistency.
  8. Instructions for making by hand with a whisk:
  9. Roll a kitchen towel into a ring and place on the counter. Set a large bowl on top for stability. Place the egg yolks in the bowl and whisk in the vinegar (or lemon juice) mustard, salt and white pepper.
  10. Begin to whisk the egg mixture vigorously and slowly add the oil, either a tablespoon at a time, or in a very thin slow steam.
  11. Once you have added the oil and the sauce is thick, taste for seasoning. Add salt and pepper or even an extra bit of vinegar or lemon juice to your personal taste.
  12. If the mayonnaise gets too thick, whisk in a tablespoon of ice water, one at a time, until it reaches the desired consistency.
  13. Keep refrigerated for up to 5 days.

Notes

Flavor Variations:

Aioli- add mashed or minced garlic to the mayonnaise

Anchovy-add pureed anchovies or anchovy paste at the end.

Sriracha-whisk in some hot sriracha chili sauce, a dash of light soy sauce and some grated ginger for a spicy Asian inspired dipping sauce.

Pesto-whisk in a couple of tablespoons of prepared pesto sauce at the end or add some pureed basil and garlic to the mix in the food processor when making the mayonnaise.

Chipotle- Use this canned smoked jalapeno in sauce to spice up a sandwich.

Extra Virgin-Use all extra virgin olive oil for a more pronounced olive oil flavor.

Rouille- season with saffron, garlic, and cayenne

http://www.formerchef.com/2014/11/29/how-to-make-homemade-mayonnaise/

How to Make Homemade Mayonnaise

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How to Make Fish Fumet (Fish Stock) and Seafood Stock

by formerchef on September 30, 2014

Post image for How to Make Fish Fumet (Fish Stock) and Seafood Stock

This post is the last in a series on home made stocks. Make sure you check out the posts on chicken stock, veal stock and vegetable stock for more on the basics of making stock. 

Fish fumet (pronounced foo-may) is a fish stock made from fish bones (and sometimes the head) of white fish such as halibut, bream, or bass. Avoid adding any skin or bloodline as this can make the stock cloudy. Fish fumet can be used as the base for some delicate sauces for poached fish, or in seafood soups like bouillabaisse, cioppino or when made with seafood, for lobster or crab bisque.

In this stock the vegetables are finely chopped because you want maximum flavor in minimum time. Rapid boiling can make the stock cloudy and simmering for longer than 20-30 min can yield a bitter flavor.

To make a seafood stock, replace the fish bones with shrimp, crab or lobster shells. See the bottom of the recipe below for instructions.

How to make Fish Fumet (fish stock) and Seafood stock

Prep Time: 35 minutes

Yield: 8 cups

Ingredients

  • 8 cups cold water
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 pounds fish bones
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1 leek, white/light green part only, thinly sliced
  • 2 each stalks celery, ½” dice
  • 1 medium yellow onion, ½” dice
  • 1 clove garlic, sliced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • ½ teaspoon white peppercorns
  • 1 ounce fresh flat leaf parsley

Instructions

  1. Rinse the fish bones to remove any excess skin or scales which might be sticking to them.
  2. Heat a large stock pot over medium heat and add the oil. Add the vegetables and stir. Cook them for about a minute but do not allow them to color. Add the fish bones and cover the pot, allowing the bones to cook until they start to become opaque (about 5 minutes).
  3. Add the wine and reduce by half. Add the cold water, bay leaf, peppercorns and parsley. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 20 minutes.
  4. Cool and strain through cheesecloth.

Notes

Seafood stock option: replace the fish bones with shrimp, crab or lobster shells.

Get the pot very hot and add the oil.

Add the shells and cook in the hot oil until they become pink.

Add the vegetables and cook until they begin to soften (about 3 minutes).

Add 1 tablespoon of tomato paste and cook it with the shells for 30 seconds.

Add the wine and stir. Add the water and herbs. Simmer and strain.

http://www.formerchef.com/2014/09/30/how-to-make-fish-fumet-fish-stock-and-seafood-stock/

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